Tell Congress to Pass the Farm Bill Supporting Organic Dairies and Other Healthy-Food Farmers

The Union of Concerned Scientists is the leading science-based nonprofit working for a healthy environment and a safer world.

Pictured:acres of natural, organic produce growing on a California organic farm may be a thing of the past without consumers’ support of the “Healthy Farmer” bill! Tell Congress that CA consumers support this bill and want Congress to pass it NOW. Photo courtesy of The Xerces Society. Copyright 2012.

Click HERE to Tell Congress: pass the Farm Bill

Dear Los Angeles Beat Readers,

Imagine this: billions of taxpayer dollars support the production of unhealthy processed foods and sugary drinks, while farmers supplying healthier items such as organic milk are overlooked or even penalized. Worse, despite an overdue and ticking timeline, Congress is sitting on its hands instead of passing legislation to address these imbalances

Sound like a bad dream? Unfortunately, it’s reality—but it doesn’t have to be.

Recent reports from the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) showed how smarter agriculture policies can help farmers grow more of the healthy fruits and vegetables we need and boost local economies along the way. Now, a new UCS study, Cream of the Crop: The Economic Benefits of Organic Dairy Farms, reveals that public investment in organic dairy farmers would pay off in multiple ways. In addition to producing a healthier product and safeguarding the environment,organic dairy farms generate greater economic opportunity and more jobs in rural communities compared with conventional dairies.

But current agriculture policy favors big polluting CAFOs (confined animal feed operations) over organic dairy farms. And because Congress has failed to act on the now-overdue 2012 Farm Bill—the 5-year legislative package that shapes U.S. agriculture—the limited programs that currently help organic dairy farmers are at risk.

We can change this, but we need quick action. Tell Congress: pass a Farm Bill—one that calls for investments in organic dairies and other healthy-food farmers—NOW.

Sincerely,
Ashley Elles
Ashley Elles
National Field Organizer
UCS Food and Environment Program

LA Beat readers CAN make a difference by telling Congress to Pass a Healthy Farm Bill.
Farmers growing healthy food items (such as organic milk) often face hurdles that others do not. Congress is past overdue in passing legislation that would address these imbalances. Tell Congress you want a Farm Bill that invests in organic dairy & healthy-food farmers, NOW! 

 
Union of Concerned Scientists
2 Brattle Square Cambridge, MA 02138-3780
phone: 800-666-8276 | Fax: 617-864-9405
ucsaction@ucsusa.org
www.ucsusa.org
Shirley Pena

About Shirley Pena

A native of Southern California, Shirley Pena began her career as a music journalist over a decade ago, writing for her websites "Stars In My Eyes:the Girlhowdy Website" and "La Raza Rock!" and progressed to creating various fan sites on Yahoo, including the first for New Zealand singer/songwriter Tim Finn. From there, she became a free agent, arranging online interviews for Yahoo fan clubs with various music artists (Andy White, John Crawford, Debora Iyall, John Easdale, etc.). She also lent her support in creating and moderating a number of Yahoo fan clubs for various music artists from the 1990s-today. As a music journalist, Shirley Pena has contributed to a number of magazines (both hard copy and online), among them:Goldmine, American Songwriter, the Fresno Examiner, The Blacklisted Journalist and UK-based Keyboard Player (where she was a principal journalist). A self-confessed "fanatic" of 1960s "British Invasion" bands, Classic Rock and nostalgic "Old Hollywood ", she also keeps her finger on the pulse of current trends in music, with a keen eye for up and coming artists of special merit. Shirley Pena loves Los Angeles, and is thrilled to join the writing staff of The Los Angeles Beat!
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